DriveThruRPG.com
Browse Categories













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
You must be logged in to rate this
Scheherazade - The One Thousand and One Nights RPG
by Florian H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/26/2020 12:19:25

This introduction was originally released on my blog diceadventurer.

I hesitated when Space Orange 42 released Sheherazade because it is a short rulebook and the price for the PDF was quite high. However, the setting and the sample characters convinced me to try it and I was not disappointed. Let me show you the selling points.

The world:

Scheherazade, namesake for this game, might be familiar to you. She is the storyteller in Arabian Nights and is the inspiration for the game. Every evening Scheherazade tells the caliph a story with a cliffhanger so she won’t be executed. The caliph, betrayed by his first wife, decided to have a new woman every day and after the night together, she will be killed. Scheherazade achieved to stay alive for 1000 nights and the caliph fell in love with her. The next day should have been their wedding but Scheherazade fell into a deep sleep. Nobody is able to wake her up and the caliph got desperate. Now the country stands still and the sovereign is not able to reign it properly. The players take the role of people who met Scheherazade and she told their stories to the caliph. Every player character had a nightmare the night Scheherazade fell into her sleep and it is up to the players to find a cure and save Scheherazade and the country.

The system:

Scheherazade uses its own system, which is called the Unique System. You start building your character by choosing or creating a concept like Old Ghoulhunter or Nimble Street urchin. This concept starts with a value of one. Then you spend so called marks to raise your attributes. The six attributes are power, precision, courage, caution, passion and reason. As you might notice those attributes form pairs and are opposites. Every full box (later boxes need two or more marks to be filled completely) raises your value by one. You can choose to spend one mark to become gifted and be able to cast magic. You also get to choose your fist two spells. Later in the game, you need to find spells in books, scrolls or learn them with the help of a teacher. Those attribute “boxes” also have different shapes. Each fully marked heart shaped box raises your Life (your HP) and fully marked stars raise your Energy (some kind of mana).

Furthermore, every character gets to start with a unique gift, which defines the character. The formula for creating those gifts is similar to stunts in Fate. You might get a bonus under certain circumstances, use other attributes for checks or you start with a relic, an ally or have a special talent (like talking to animals). I really like the examples and you can use random tables for character creation, if you want to.

You make checks with six sided dice. The GM tells the player which two attributes are used and you pick as many dice as you have in those two attributes (e.g. XXX + YYY for XYZ). If your concept fits, you can add its value to the number of dice. Every 4, 5 or 6 is a success and you have to beat the difficulty. One die should have a different colour or size. If this die shows a “6” the check still has a positive side effect, even if the check is a failure and otherwise a “1” has always some kind of negative aspect. Beside normal checks, you can also have complex tasks. These tasks have a difficulty and a complexity. The GM sets the interval for rolling (e.g. for picking a lock you could have a roll every minute or for a complex research you can roll every 5 hours). Successes reduce the complexity of the task and by reaching zero the task is completed. Generally, the GM does not roll. The players make all actions and reactions.

In a fight, the players roll for initiative and compare it to the level (the difficulty) of the enemies. The battlefield consists of zones. A successful attack results in either doing damage or hindering the enemy. Hindering the enemy lowers its level until its next turn (which is great to enable weaker player characters to do damage). Every success beyond the difficulty can be traded into one point of damage or an effect. Therefore, you need two successes to hit a level 2 bandit. With four successes, you could deal two points of damage and lower its level by 1. Defending works the same, but instead of dealing damage, you can lower the amount taken. Scheherazade is a very heroic game and by default, characters don’t die easily. There are optional rules to make it grittier and more dangerous.

Gear doesn’t have mechanical effects, they are just for the fiction. Some objects are special and have keywords (e.g. tool or two hands). Those who know PbtA-games might feel right at home, but those tags/keywords also have a mechanical effect. The examples and instructions in the book are really good how to use those keywords and with this system players are encouraged to create individualized gear.

A special resource are the Moon-Points. With these points you can reroll or create fictional elements (e.g. a cart in the street to reach the rooftops). You gain those points by being heroic, selfless or finding creative solutions to a problem. You can also tell a tale at a campfire or write a poem or story between sessions. What I really like is that these stories could be rumours or legends and the GM is encouraged to implement those elements into the world. So if a player recites a legend of a flying carpet in a hidden cave, the GM could drop hints in the game where to find it. This is a great way to get the players invested and interested in the world.

The magic system in Scheherazade is very simple and easy to use. A gifted person needs to spend Energy and most of the spells require a simple check. If you want to get more spells after character creation, you have to find them. You get marks after adventures (basically XP) but most of the time the GM should reward the players with other things, like objects, contacts and treasures. The book contains some examples for things like spells and objects, but the GM should come up with his own creations and with the given rules, it is quite easy. Enemies consist mostly of background and description. They have some keywords and which level their attacks and initiative have (some enemies are stronger so their attack lvl is higher). As with objects and spells, it’s really easy to build your own enemies.

The book:

I own the PDF and the hardcover. Both are in English and are full colour. The artwork is beautiful and the art style was the decisive factor in buying the book. The layout is good as well, very clear and good to read. Scheherazade has only 171 pages and the GM and the group has to put in some work. You don’t get much adventure hooks, but you can just take a story of Arabian Nights and you have your adventure. I think the PDF and the hardcover are quite expensive for the amount of pages you get. However, the system is amazing and I already hacked it for a session One Piece. I think the Unique System would fit perfectly for Star Wars, Pulp (like Hollow Earth Expedition, Indiana Jones, etc.) or Harry Potter.

Who might be interested in Scheherazade:

  • GMs and players who like to play ruleslite and pulpy/heroic adventures
  • People who want to focus on storytelling
  • Players who want to bring their ideas to the setting

Who might not be interested in Scheherazade:

  • GMs and players who want to have complex and extensive rules
  • People who need lots of ready to play material (items, adventures, enemies)
  • Players who want to create mechanically detailed characters


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Scheherazade - The One Thousand and One Nights RPG
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Aces High! (SWADE option)
by Laimonas P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/22/2020 17:51:57

Really good product, I can see me using this in many situations when I need scene to move fast but still have some amount of detail. Just be aware that despite the actual page count all the content could easily fill 2 - 3 pages.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Aces High!  (SWADE option)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Guardians of Sol-Tau
by Laimonas P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/21/2020 16:09:20

I had run this one for a three players' group in one eight hour session, but my advice is to plan this as a two session game. A short review would be: it's a good scenario, I highly recommend it.

The (a bit) longer version: the scenario itself is very straightforward space opera, the book is pretty open about where it gets the inspiration (Star Wars and Guardians of the Galaxy), there's nothing to blow your mind with originality, and the adventure is very linear, literally discouraging the players from taking any detours off the set course of the events.

That said, every Savage Worlds GM should runt this at least once. Why? Because the way the adventure is presented and tied with the SW rules is one of the best examples of module writing. You will have an opportunity to experience dramatic almost all the subsystems and mechanics of SW: dramatic tasks, social conflict, chase, space combat. After playing this my players were really impressed by how flexible and adaptable Savage Worlds system is, even though two of them already had some experience with the system. One should basically go from dor to dor holding this book and telling: Do you have time to talk about our Lord and Saviour of the RPG: Savage Worlds?

There's also a fantastic layout of the book. It's easy to find anything you need and usually everything you need for a scene is on one page, which greatly helps when you want to keep the frantic tempo of the adventure. The only other so well written book I know is Mothership, and I believe that the creators of Guardians of Sol-Tau took some inspiration from there or some other modern OSRs.

So why four stars not five? Because I feel that for the price the book could include a few extra pages with location maps and a bit more background for the setting. You can run it as it is but then you will inevitably need to improvise or to spend some time preparing, which is fine but it makes me think that the book should be 1-2 USD cheaper.

In any case have you noticed the big number 1 on the cover of the book? I hope I will see at numbers 2 and 3 (at least) someday!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Guardians of Sol-Tau
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Guardians of Sol-Tau
by Ryan H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/21/2020 02:06:54

Seems to be a great intro to savage worlds and the SWADE subsystems.

You can perform a few combats, a chase, dogfight, social encounter, dangerous quick ecnounter, dramatic task, and more within 1-3 sessions.

Comes with 6 pregens, so you can hop right in after picking some characters.

The art is solid and there is enough lore here to get the short adventure done, with some neat modifications to some of the standard SWADE systems. e.g. adventure specific chase complications.

Overall, my players-all new to savage worlds-have loved their time so far and we are eager to see how their story concludes. I'm left wanting to know more about the rest of Sol-Tau, for sure.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ultima Forsan - Setting Book
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/31/2020 12:25:53

This is a well written and unique setting. While I have not run it as is, I have mined it for material & ideas for a variety of my own games.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ultima Forsan - Setting Book
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Gold&Glory: Garden of Bones
by anthony h. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/25/2020 09:35:01

Now I’ll admit, at first I was a bit put off by the lack of evocative description written in the “Story So Far” section located at the front of the PDF. Anyone who reads my blog Journey Through the Darklands can tell my personal tastes lay firmly in purple prose and run on sentences (they can work damnit!). Given that, it’s important to set proper expectations. Mork Borg this is not. Meaning, while some books put more emphasis on presentation and the setting of mood, others value more brief texts that are readily usable at a glance. A great example of this design is found in the Tomb of the Serpent Kings, an excellent beginner dungeon with which shares many similarities to GOB. Anyway, the story is simple, taking only 3 sentences to tell; In a time lost to myth, a powerful Necromancer had a gift rejected by the object of his desire (left unspecified as to who). In his lonely frustration the Necromancer created a vile garden of terror. Simple no? Well, that’s the point.

Most of what lay within this brief section goes to possible hooks for the players to get involved in the GOB, and forewarnings that the Magic Items and certain hazards – when dropped into an ongoing campaign – can be turning points of lasting consequence. Leaving the love interest a blank slate allows DM’s to insert their own relevant NPC’s or historic characters to the module for easy integration.

The Rumors section is brief, being heavy on colourful description in some places, and less so in others, as much of the module is throughout. All of it reads easily at a glance and gets the gears in my head to whir their motors towards setup and payoff later on when these tables are tested in play. It’s fun stuff.

General Appearance reads mostly like flavor text found in general D&D content, with the few exceptions where gameplay mechanics are detailed. In G&G, dungeons are described as either cavernous or indoors with little alteration. In GOB however, there are typically no walls, instead having an eerie green fog block the sight of those unwilling to go through the mist’s themselves. This design choice gives a flavor felt in the actual playing of the dungeon and is ever present, which I think really sells the unique atmosphere. Another deviation from standard G&G dungeons, is that this module focuses solely on randomizing it’s dungeon in a constant rotation.

Whereas in G&G there is an option of using the generation method to prepare a dungeon’s layout and contents before a session, GOB limits and expands the randomization option during the session alone. Once the entrance to a room is no longer visible, the dungeon rearranges itself, so that wherever players may go, a new room awaits. For the most part at least, as players may by accident stumble into old rooms as decided by the draw of the dungeon deck. Leaving the garden itself is impossible by navigation alone, instead requiring extreme luck or the destruction of a certain object.

Room generation is done one by one, drawing three cards from your “dungeon deck”. The value of the first two cards tell you the length and width of the room or area respectively. Any of the three cards suite and value determine content. Hearts are read on the hazards table, and Diamonds on treasures.

We’ve got traps like suffocating fogs, bushes of spiked bone flinging bone bristle spears at a character’s single misstep, bone spiders and swarms of various vermin ready to take you life and eat your corpse. We’ve got a towering guardian beast made of shifting forms of scavenged bone, flowers capable of prolonging life or issuing death, diamonds embedded in black crystal skulls, thrones of dead carcasses, fountains of blood, and that’s not even half of it! The module is 20 pages front to back, which is double the length of the 7 dungeons found in the G&G core rulebook. That should give a good idea of just how much is packed into this thing.

Hell, as I write this the idea of using these tables to generate content in my own dungeons free of the module itself seems not only plausible, but likely. It’s a great module that practically runs itself if you are good with improving at the table, and I would recommend it at the very least to help generate ideas for whatever you’re currently working on.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gold&Glory: Garden of Bones
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Guardians of Sol-Tau
by Umberto P. c. L. G. S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/09/2020 08:11:44

I printed the printer friendly version (tip: set two pages per sheet in print options) and read it while commuting. This is a BRILLIANT scenario: the type of never-ending action I expect from a Savage Worlds adventure, with over the top situations and a glorious finale (if everything goes well!). The art and layout are fresh, and really help set the tone, which clearly is inspired to Guardians of the Galaxy, but maybe also Saturday morning cartoons, imho. This might become my go to adventure for introducing Savage Worlds to new or younger players, too!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Guardians of Sol-Tau
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Guardians of Sol-Tau
by mauro l. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/25/2020 03:51:31

Andrea Mollica and Giuseppe Rotondo have done a great job, AS USUAL. This is the perfect scenario to showcase all the special subsystems available for Savage worlds GMs, and it's an awesome story in its own right! Can't wait to run it with my group AND my kids!

I also suggest to use this scenario together with the Aces High system.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Guardians of Sol-Tau
by Marco B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/22/2020 15:14:15

Just finished reading through the adventure and I can't wait to run it! The story is glorious and full of action, and the presentation makes it super easy to move from one part to the other. It's nice, for once, to have an adventure that tells you what to do if the group fails at some task!

I already had Aces High but hadn't had a chance to try it yet. Now this scenario seems the perfect fix for that too!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gold&Glory: Seven Deadly Dungeons (Savage Worlds Adventure Edition)
by greg m. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/09/2020 13:41:32

This is a super fun way to get a group together and running into a dungeon in under 30 minutes, GM included. It's also a pretty solid way to introduce new players to Savage worlds because it laser focuses you in character creation. You pull some cards and boom! You're a Oglar the half-ork rouge). Also, the ability to easily dynamically generate dungeons (7 of them are included!) I highly recommend to anyone wanting to run a fun and quick OSR style dungeon crawl.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gold&Glory: Seven Deadly Dungeons (Savage Worlds Adventure Edition)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Gold&Glory: The Halls of the Damned
by Annalisa B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/19/2020 17:57:29

This one dungeon is how I wish all adventures could be. Great atmosphere and ingenious puzzles, all connected to the theme and lore. And it works anyway you play it! Also, the layout is amazing on my tablet and makes it very handy to use at the table



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gold&Glory: The Halls of the Damned
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Scheherazade - The One Thousand and One Nights RPG
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/10/2020 04:22:27

https://www.teilzeithelden.de/2020/01/10/ersteindruck-scheherazade-rollenspiel-aus-tausendundeiner-nacht/

Noch sind die Nächte lang und kalt – die beste Zeit, sich mit Fantasie (und einer Kanne Tee) in wärmere Gefilde zu versetzen. Scheherazade ist ein Rollenspielsystem für Geschichtenerzählerinnen, Märchenonkel und andere Fans von Fabeln aus dem Morgenland, das auf narratives Spiel und exotisches Flair setzt.

Europäische Sagen und Märchen sind die Hauptinspirationsquelle vieler klassischer Fantasy-Rollenspiele – an morgenländische Märchen erinnernde Szenarien kommen oft höchstens als Nebenschauplatz oder exotisches Heimatland des einen oder anderen Charakters vor. Dabei sind die Geschichten aus Tausendundeiner Nacht und an sie angelehnte orientalisierende Märchen seit gut drei Jahrhunderten in Europa bekannt und sehr beliebt. Von fliegenden Teppichen, Wünsche erfüllenden Flaschengeistern, Sindbad dem Seefahrer und Ali Baba haben wir wohl alle schon einmal gehört – und viele auch eine relativ gute Vorstellung, wie sie in ein Rollenspiel-Setting einzufügen wären. Was läge also näher, als ein ganzes Rollenspielsystem darauf aufzubauen?

Die Spielwelt Die Welt von Scheherazade ist – wenig überraschend – die der Märchen aus Tausendundeiner Nacht: angesetzt in einer phantastischen Version vom Bagdad des islamischen Mittelalters, in der die schöne Scheherazade in den Fängen des grausamen Kalifen Shahryar Nacht für Nacht Geschichten erzählt, um ihr Leben zu retten. Im Märchen ist der Kalif nach eintausendundeiner Nacht so weit besänftigt, dass er davon absieht, Scheherazade am Morgen zu töten und sie stattdessen heiratet. Das Rollenspielsetting weicht hier vom Quellenmaterial ab. In Scheherazade ist die Titelheldin in einen magischen Schlaf verfallen, und die Charaktere sollen sie retten, denn andernfalls wird das Kalifat untergehen und eine Armee böser Dschinns möglicherweise Einwohnerinnen und Einwohner heimsuchen. Letzteres wird allerdings nur angedeutet.

Der Einstieg in die Spielwelt erfolgt in Form einer Geschichte, die die Spielenden quasi mitten ins Geschehen wirft. Diese Rahmenhandlung ist als Vorschlag für einen Kampagneneinstieg vorgesehen, jedoch ist es nicht zwingend notwendig, sich daran zu orientieren. Das Setting bietet auch eine große Bandbreite an Möglichkeiten für unabhängige One-Shots. Bagdad, die Prächtige, die im Einstiegstext kurz beschrieben wird, ist die Hauptstadt des „Kalifats des Ewigen Mondes“, eines ebenso mächtigen wie märchenhaften Reiches, das den gesamten Vorderen Orient von Ägypten bis nach Indien umfasst. Darin können geneigte Spielgruppen alles erleben, was in den Märchen aus Tausendundeiner Nacht, den daran angelehnten Geschichten von Wilhelm Hauff und deren popkulturellen Adaptionen von Isnogud bis Prince of Persia vorkommt: wilde Verfolgungsjagden auf fliegenden Teppichen, Kämpfe mit bösartigen Ifriten, verschlagenen Magiern oder reanimierten ägyptischen Mumien, Schatzsuchen in den uralten Tempeln vergangener Kulturen und Ärger mit daraus resultierenden Flüchen. Alles, was in ein orientalisches Setting passt, ist erlaubt und erwünscht, historische Akkuratesse nicht zwingend notwendig. Das Setting ist als „Teen“, also „familienfreundlich“ und nicht wirklich für düstere Horrorkampagnen oder allzu realistische Szenarien vorgesehen. Die Beschreibung hält sich weniger mit Details der Welt auf, sondern verweist auf die Inspirationsquellen und appelliert an die Fantasie der Spielleitung.

Da das angesprochene Publikum wie der Autor Umberto Pignatelli eher europäischer Herkunft ist und die wenigsten Interessierten einen Hintergrund in arabischer Literaturgeschichte haben werden, bleibt das Ganze natürlich ein wenig stereotyp. Das stört erst mal nicht wirklich, könnte aber dazu führen, dass irgendwann die Ideen rar werden. Also eher eine Wahl für Kurzkampagnen, Spontanrunden und Cons – dafür eignet sich die Welt allerdings hervorragend, da nicht viel erklärt werden muss. Der Einstieg erfolgt in Form einer Geschichte, die die Spielenden quasi mitten ins Geschehen wirft: Darin führt der blinde Bettler Ali den Charakter (oder die Charaktere) durch den geschäftigen Basar von Bagdad in die größte Bibliothek der Stadt, wo sie ein geheimnisvolles Buch finden, in dem … aber davon ein anderes Mal.

Die Regeln Scheherazade ist eine Märchenwelt, in der heroische Aktionen belohnt werden und Realismus nicht das Hauptanliegen ist. Dementsprechend ist auch das Regelsystem eher auf narratives Spiel als auf Würfelergebnisse ausgerichtet. Ein bisschen Würfeln ist allerdings schon vorgesehen. Dafür brauchen die Beteiligten je ein Dutzend W6, von denen einer als „Schicksalswürfel“ erkennbar sein muss (also etwa eine andere Farbe oder Größe haben sollte als der Rest). Er wird mit jedem Wurf mitgewürfelt und sorgt für zusätzliche Konsequenzen, unabhängig vom allgemeinen Ergebnis. Wenn er eine 1 zeigt, ergibt sich eine negative Konsequenz, bei einer 6 ein Bonus.

Gewürfelt wird mit Pools, die sich in der Regel aus zwei Attributen des Charakters berechnen. Jede 4, 5 und 6 zählt als Erfolg, niedrigere Ergebnisse als Misserfolg. Die Anzahl an Erfolgen wird mit einem Schwierigkeitsgrad verglichen, wenn dieser erreicht ist, gilt die Aktion als geschafft. Je weiter die Anzahl an Erfolgen den Schwierigkeitsgrad übersteigt, desto mehr zusätzliche positive Konsequenzen ergeben sich aus dem Wurf. Umgekehrt gilt das auch für negative Konsequenzen, wenn der Schwierigkeitsgrad weit verfehlt wurde. Bestimmte Umstände, Hilfsmittel, Beschreibungen oder Ideen können den Schwierigkeitsgrad herunter- oder heraufsetzen. In speziellen Fällen kann eine Aktion selbst dann als erfolgreich gelten, wenn sie um einen Würfel nicht erreicht wurde – dann allerdings mit einer Nebenwirkung nach Ermessen der Spielleitung.

NPC, gegen die gekämpft wird, zählen ebenfalls als Schwierigkeitslevel. Jeder Erfolg, der das Gegnerlevel übersteigt, zählt als ein „Effekt“, also entweder ein Schaden, der dem Gegner zugefügt wurde, oder eine Aktion, die die Gegenseite behindert oder zurückwirft. Die Kampfregeln sehen außerdem vor, den Schauplatz eines Kampfes in verschiedene Zonen einzuteilen, die helfen sollen, die Szene zu visualisieren. Das bietet allen Beteiligten die Möglichkeit, dramatische Beschreibungen ihrer Aktionen vorzubringen und sich miteinander abzusprechen. Dies verhindert nicht nur, dass der Kampf langweilig wird, sondern wird auch mit Boni belohnt und ist ausdrücklich erwünscht.

Ein Alleinstellungsmerkmal des Systems ist der Einsatz von Geschichten in der Geschichte. Ganz im Sinne der Erzählerin Scheherazade gibt es hin und wieder die Gelegenheit, im Spiel eine Geschichte aus der Vergangenheit des eigenen Charakters, ein Märchen oder eine Fabel zum Besten zu geben. Dies hilft nicht nur bei der Charakterentwicklung, sondern kann auch ganz konkrete Vorteile im Spiel bringen. Manche mythischen Monster lassen sich durch eine gute Erzählung besänftigen und NSC sind unter Umständen bereit, etwas Wertvolles für die Kurzweil eines spannenden Seemannsgarns einzutauschen.

Charaktererschaffung

Die Charaktere sind Heldinnen und Helden mit manchmal ganz besonderen Eigenschaften. Charaktere in Scheherazade sind einfach erschaffen. Sie haben sechs Attribute, die bei Level 1 beginnen und mit 12 weiteren Punkten gesteigert werden können. Dabei handelt es sich um die Eigenschaften Stärke (Power), Präzision (Precision), Mut (Courage), Vorsicht (Caution), Leidenschaft (Passion) und Vernunft (Reason). Zusätzlich gibt es das Attribut Ressourcen, das die generelle finanzielle Situation des Charakters darstellt. Dieses startet ebenfalls auf 1, es gibt aber auch die Möglichkeit, die Eigenschaft „arm“ zu wählen, was bedeutet, dass der Charakter auf der Straße lebt und betteln muss, um sein Leben zu finanzieren, dafür aber einen zusätzlichen Punkt für andere Attribute bekommt. Aus den Attributen errechnen sich die Würfelpools für alle gewürfelten Aktionen.

Dazu wird ein grundsätzliches Konzept des Charakters gewählt – etwa „Seemann“, „Fakir“, „Amazonenkriegerin“ oder Ähnliches – und passendes Equipment ausgewählt. Jeder Charakter bekommt außerdem ein besonderes Talent. Dieses kann ganz individuell gestaltet werden, solange es mit der Spielleitung abgesprochen ist. Immerhin sind die Charaktere die Heldinnen und Helden eines Märchens, und diese haben manchmal ganz besondere Eigenschaften. Dennoch ist das Powerlevel am Anfang eher niedrig – schließlich soll das Abenteuer der Charaktere hier erst beginnen und gute Ideen sollen ohnehin wichtiger sein als riesige Würfelpools.

Erscheinungsbild Orientalisch, ornamental und ein bisschen comicartig lässt sich der Stil beschreiben, den Zeichnerin Sara Valentino für die Illustrationen des Regelbuches gewählt hat. Das Cover schmückt das Gesicht der titelgebenden Scheherazade vor dem Hintergrund des Mondes über Märchen-Bagdad. Der Großteil der Bilder im Buch zeigt Figuren, die im Setting als SC oder NSC vorkommen könnten – heilige Kriegerinnen, edle Beduinen, verführerische Odalisken, bitterböse Großwesire und mehr. Natürlich kommen dabei auch Monster aller Art und andere mögliche GegnerInnen vor. Der witzige Zeichenstil unterstreicht die heitere Stimmung des Settings und erinnert ein wenig an die TV-Serie Aladdin.

Das generelle Layout bleibt dem orientalischen Stil treu. Der Bildrand, Titelseiten und einige Überschriften sind in satten Farben und Mustern, die an Orientteppiche und arabische Architektur erinnern, gestaltet, der Hintergrund der Fließtexte ist sandfarben wie die syrische Wüste. Die gewählte Schriftart scheint ein Kompromiss dazwischen zu sein, diesen Ornamentstil zu komplementieren und dabei noch gut zu lesen zu sein, allerdings wäre es mir persönlich lieber gewesen, wenn man hier der Lesbarkeit stärkeren Vorzug gegeben hätte.

Die Inhaltsangabe des PDFs verlinkt auf die jeweiligen Seiten, Verweise auf andere Seiten im Fließtext sind allerdings nicht verlinkt. Das Dokument ist durchsuchbar.

Fazit Selten habe ich ein neues Rollenspielsystem so gerne ganz durchgelesen wie dieses. Scheherazade richtet sich ganz klar an Menschen, die gerne Geschichten erzählen oder erzählt bekommen.

Auf ungefähr 170 Seiten ist das Grundregelwerk eher kurz, was vor allem daran liegt, dass die Spielwelt nicht in zu ausufernden Details beschrieben wird. Der Autor verlässt sich darauf, dass wer an diesem System interessiert ist, genug Kenntnis des Quellenmaterials hat, um daraus mit Fantasie eigene Geschichten zu stricken. Das Regelsystem ist einfach und favorisiert narratives Spiel über Würfelorgien. Charaktere sind Ruckzuck erstellt. Eine Besonderheit, die Scheherazade von anderen Rollenspielen absetzt, ist der Einsatz von Geschichten. Sie können für gewisse Vorteile im Spiel eingesetzt werden und fördern dabei Charakterspiel und die Ausgestaltung der Spielwelt.

Der Eindruck, der vom ersten Lesen und Anspielen des enthaltenen Abenteuers zurückbleibt, ist der eines kleinen, aber feinen Rollenspiels, das sich nicht unbedingt für dauerhafte Runden eignet – außer vielleicht bei knallharten Fans orientalischer Märchen – aber für Cons oder spontane Spielabende eine schöne Ergänzung darstellt.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Scheherazade - The One Thousand and One Nights RPG
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Scheherazade - The One Thousand and One Nights RPG
by Cameron D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/29/2019 20:34:28

When Umberto reached out to me to review this, I got really excited, as I have a deep love of Arabic and Middle Eastern mythology - hence why I was part of the Black Void RPG core team. Umberto and the SpaceOrange team did an amazing job in respectfully and honestly adapting so much lore and history into a beautiful looking and beautifully laid-out game. Character creation is super easy, and overall the mechanics are very easy to pick up - however the biggest thing I think this game really has going for it is excellent art and overall a cohesive motif. Pulling its inspiration from the original Thousand and One Nights tales, Scheherazade is a fantastic piece that is well worth its full price. I look forward to seeing more in this universe in the future. Perhaps a Gilgamesh expansion? Comics, Clerics, & Controllers d20 Roll: Nat 20



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gold&Glory: Seven Deadly Dungeons (Savage Worlds Adventure Edition)
by David R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/09/2019 11:50:59

If you are looking to capture the old-school dungeon crawl feel using Savage Worlds as your ruleset, G&G is the way to go. It provides an excellent set of rules that allow the party to jump right into the action and fulfill their "murder hobo" desires. The rules have been updated to support the latest Savage Worlds Adventure Edition, and include random character creation (optional), defined races and classes, modified character advancement, defined arcane abilities, a bestiary and a random dungeon generator as well.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gold&Glory: Seven Deadly Dungeons (Savage Worlds Adventure Edition)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Scheherazade - The One Thousand and One Nights RPG
by Giuseppe R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/01/2019 09:30:36

I simply can't believe how clever this game is. A wonderful setting of adventures, full of mysteries and charm, comes to life through a rules systems that encourages clever, narrative play, and seems perfect for a younger audience too.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Scheherazade - The One Thousand and One Nights RPG
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 46 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates